The Case for Tablet Audiometry

Canadian Audiologist logoIt was a revolution in communication and one that lay the foundation for technological advances such as the smart phone. In 1876, Alexander Graham Bell patented the telephone. It was not his only scientific contribution, albeit his most famous one.

Bell witnessed the impacts of hearing loss firsthand. His mother lost her hearing as a child and his wife was deaf. Additionally, his grandfather, father, and brother all worked in areas associated with speech and hearing. This exposure and subsequent interest led him to develop the first audiometer in 1879. Around that same time German physician, Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz, invented an electrically driven tuning fork to measure hearing sensitivity.

Read the whole story in Canadian Audiologist.

Health tech startup sees hearing test market as ripe for disruption

Med City News logoClearwater Clinical, a Canadian medical device company, wants to address the challenges facing the hearing industry by developing a self-directed hearing test to help communities underserved by audiologists. In an interview with CEO Michael Weider, who pitched the company’s approach at the Venture+ Forum at HIMSS this week, he said he sees the tablet-based testing platform, called Shoebox, as a way to make hearing tests more accessible and portable.

Is mHealth the Solution to the Global Audiology Shortage?

Canadian Audiologist logo

The first prerequisite in order to effect change is to recognize that there is a problem. In 2011 the World Health Organization reported that 360,000,000 people worldwide have disabling hearing loss.1

This is especially distressing because 32 million of those affected are children and 80% live in low and middle-income countries without adequate access to hearing health care. Lack of equipment, the absence of trained personnel and limited health care infrastructure all compound to create circumstances where an easily treatable hearing loss is ignored and the full impact of disability is felt.

Read the whole story at Canadian Audiology here.

Canadian hearing-test app for Third World finding new uses here

CBC logoAn iPad app to diagnose hearing loss in children in the developing world has come full circle.

Developed for use in impoverished countries like Uganda, the app has now come back home to Canada where its creators realize it would save Western health-care systems both time and money.

“It’s cheap, accurate, validated and easy to use,” says Dr. Matthew Bromwich, an ENT surgeon at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario in Ottawa who oversaw the development of the app.

Read the full story at CBC News here.

Press Release: SHOEBOX iPad Audiometer Professional Version Available Now

San Antonio, TX— March 24, 2015 — Today, Clearwater Clinical announced the general release of version 2.0 of the SHOEBOX iPad Audiometer. SHOEBOX is the first and only clinically validated iPad Audiometer. With today’s announcement, this groundbreaking product now comes with both automated and manual modes. In automated mode, the user can self-test their hearing loss by playing an iPad game. Manual mode allows the Audiologist to control the test like a traditional audiometer.

Continue Reading

Press Release: Clearwater Founder Wins Award for Mobile Health Innovation for SHOEBOX Audiometer

OTTAWA – Pediatric surgeon and entrepreneur Dr. Matthew Bromwich accepted the “TELUS Award for mHealth Innovation” at the 29th Annual CATAAlliance Innovation Awards Gala. He accepted the award on behalf of a team effort to develop and successfully implement a new approach to test hearing impairment worldwide, called ShoeBOX Audiometry.

Continue Reading

Categories